CHESS OPENINGS TRAPS AND ZAPS PDF

For the developing student, this group of openings is an excellent training ground in tactics and active piece play. In the Center Game 1. White then regains this pawn by capturing on d4 with his Queen. Such an early Queen move is theoretically a liability, and after 3. Nc6, White indeed must back the Queen out of the center, losing time.

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For the developing student, this group of openings is an excellent training ground in tactics and active piece play. In the Center Game 1. White then regains this pawn by capturing on d4 with his Queen. Such an early Queen move is theoretically a liability, and after 3. Nc6, White indeed must back the Queen out of the center, losing time. Despite this drawback, the Center Game offers White reasonably good chances, and Black must play energetically in midcourt to secure equality. The Danish Gambit 1.

Bc4 cxb2 5. Bxb2 is an entirely different kettle of fish. Here, White sacrifices two pawns to accelerate development. This is not a humble opening, and if White fails to generate sufficient attacking possibilities, he will will simply be two pawns down with no compensation.

Black, lacking development, must defend carefully. Rather than clinging too greedily to his extra pawns, he should return one or both of them to mobilize his forces.

The Coring Gambit 1. Nf3 Nc6 3. Here, White generally restricts himself to sacrificing only one pawn, thus minimizing much of the risk entailed in the Danish. The Scotch Gambit 1. Bc4 resembles the Goring Gambit, with the sacrifice of a single pawn for speedy development.

Exactly what constitutes a Scotch Gambit is not so clear to the casual player. It is often perceived as a transitional opening leading to a complex of related openings. The Scotch Game 1. With a pawn on e4 and a Knight on d4, White has the makings of a powerfully centralized game, and Black must conscientiously combine development and counterattack before White consolidates these assests into a concrete, permanent advantage.

This spirited thrust will allow Black to enter the middlegame on an even keel. There are three safe squares for the Queen that also defend the pawn: c3, e3, and f4. Qc3, then 6. Qe3, then 6. Ng4 7. Qe4 or 7.

Bxe7 Qxe7 8. Qe4 Ngxe5 7. Ngxe5 gains the e5-pawn. And if 6. Qf4, then 6. Nh5 7. Qf3 or 7. Bxe7 Qxe7 wins the e-pawn next move 7. Bxg5 8. Qxh5 Bc1 9. Nd2 Bxb2 Rb1 Bxe5 puts Black two pawns ahead. Instead of the unprepared advance 5. Afterward, he may be able to castle Queenside.

First build your game by rapid development. Before bringing it out, develop a couple of minor pieces. White disrupts with 9. Kxd8 or 9. Ke7 Black says goodbye to his Queen. Interpretation: If your King is still uncastled, avoid opening the center, giving your opponent some access to your fettered monarch. Black gauged that his Queen was adequately guarded by the f6-Knight after 8. They could force you to change your plans completely. After the obligatory Qh6 mate. Especially vulnerable are the squares traveled by the Bishop—for Black, the dark squares.

If you can get away with it, fine; but here, White actually wins by exploiting the undefended f6 with a Knight and also the abandoned h6 with his Queen. Be chary about early, impulsive pawn moves since they ususally bring on enemy attack. As Marcus Aurelius put it, What is not good for the swarm is not good for the bee. No prisoners are taken after 9. If the g6-Knight flees to e7, then Bh6 capitalizes on a debilitating pin. So Black continues 9. Nge5, when Qe8, making it impossible for that piece to lend defense from f6.

And here came more surprises, for Bf6 g6 Rh8 mate. It would have been more enterprising to develop this piece to f6. Black, too, castles into a powerful attack force spearheaded by the h-pawn.

Moving it up, White introduces his h1-Rook with deadly effect. No matter what White answers, his Queen goes: A 9. Interpretation: White bought a couple of bad raps here. That compels the Bishop to move again to save itself, which causes your opponent to waste a turn. So White naturally responded with 7. This mechanical move weakened the d3 square, leaving it without pawn protection. White could have avoided loss of his Queen even after that, however, for there was no need to play 8.

The simple retreat 4. Qe3-e2 would have averted disaster. Qe3-g3, because it is natural to move the Queen aggressively, since its great power is always uppermost in the mind. Bring it out early and your opponent can attack it and force you to waste time saving it. Kb1, is forced, but it wins. Black has to save his threatened a2-Knight, Qxd5, but after Kxe7 In the end, White stays a piece ahead. T team could get at it. Knight-pawns and Rook-pawns tend to bring on a hullabaloo. Too often, taking them means putting your pieces out of play, wasting time, and pushing your King out on a high wire.

But a simple recapture on d5 restores his excellent chances. White tackles her poor position with a series of troublesome threats. The starting move is 8. Black can try to save his Queen in several ways: A 8. Qg6 9. Qxg4 9. Kxf7, then Rg1 Qh3 Qh3 9. Rg1, followed by Sign up to read more!

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Chess Openings: Traps And Zaps

Sep 11, Ho Hua rated it really liked it This is an interesting book for chess enthusiasts. Or rather, enthusiasts of the chess opening who want to spring opening traps on their board opponents. Nicely explained, with a short introduction to each of the openings mentioned. The drawback is that the book deals with dual e pawn openings only Jul 30, Buffalonickel rated it liked it Nice concept as everyone loves devastating his or her opponent in the opening of a match. Or avoiding the dumb mistakes where he or she is devastated in the opening moves. Still, the problem with Mr. There are some pretty cool "traps" and "zaps" in there but you might play hundreds or maybe even thousands!

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