ENGINEERING IN MERCIA MUDSTONE PDF

These strata affect the construction industry mainly in operations such as foundations, excavations and earthworks. When designing earthworks or structural foundations in, on or using Mercia mudstone, the designer needs to understand how the engineering properties are linked to the geological history. This report replaces Report 47, and provides up-to-date information about the engineering properties of the Mercia Mudstone Group in order to improve the investigation, design and construction of ground engineering works in these materials. It sets out the geological history and links this to the engineering properties for some regularly encountered design situations.

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Distribution[ edit ] The group outcrops widely across England, representing deposition within numerous Triassic basins, some of which are physically connected at depth. Northwards the outcrop splits either side of the Pennines where deposition took place across the East Midlands Shelf of Nottinghamshire and through Yorkshire to the North Sea coast at Hartlepool.

A western arm includes the Stafford and Cheshire basins, West Lancashire and the Carlisle Basin - the latter are connected at depth beneath the Irish Sea. Stratigraphy[ edit ] Blue Anchor Formation[ edit ] The formation is named from the village of Blue Anchor on the coast of west Somerset. It consists largely of green to grey mudstones and siltstones which gave rise to the earlier name of this sequence, the Tea-green Marls and varies from around 5m to 67m in thickness.

Though common to all other areas, the Blue Anchor Formation is absent through erosion in the Stafford Basin and in Lancashire. It is of late Norian to early Rhaetian age. It is overlain by the Westbury Formation of the Penarth Group which represents widespread inundation of the Triassic basins as global sea levels rose. It consists of a 2m to 24m thickness of mudstones, siltstones and sandstones with occasional pebble beds.

It generally has a more greenish grey colour than the formations above and below it though it is not readily distinguishable within the sequence in Cheshire. It is of Anisian through Ladinian to Carnian age. Scythian to Anisian in age. Kirkham Mudstone member[ edit ] Formerly known as the Kirkham Mudstone Formation named from the small Lancashire town of Kirkham , this member is Anisian to Ladinian in age.

Preesall Halite member[ edit ] Formerly known as the Preesall Salt named from the Lancashire village of Preesall , this member is Anisian to Ladinian in age. Tarporley Siltstone Formation[ edit ] The Tarporley Siltstone Formation named from the Cheshire village of Tarporley is Anisian in age and comprises siltstones, mudstones and sandstones. The thickness of the sequence varies from 20m in parts of the East Midlands to around m in the Cheshire Basin.

It is encountered in older literature under various guises but commonly as the Keuper Waterstones or simply Waterstones.

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Engineering geological studies of bedrock formations

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Distribution[ edit ] The group outcrops widely across England, representing deposition within numerous Triassic basins, some of which are physically connected at depth. Northwards the outcrop splits either side of the Pennines where deposition took place across the East Midlands Shelf of Nottinghamshire and through Yorkshire to the North Sea coast at Hartlepool. A western arm includes the Stafford and Cheshire basins, West Lancashire and the Carlisle Basin - the latter are connected at depth beneath the Irish Sea. Stratigraphy[ edit ] Blue Anchor Formation[ edit ] The formation is named from the village of Blue Anchor on the coast of west Somerset.

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