ECTOPHYLLA ALBA PDF

Chiroderma Ectophylla relative to other genera [2] The Honduran white bat was described as a new species, Ectophylla alba, in by American zoologist Harrison Allen. Within Phyllostomidae, it is in the subfamily Stenodermatinae. Its species name "alba" comes from Latin " albus " meaning "white. This species, along with four Diclidurus species and the ghost bat Macroderma gigas , is among the only currently known species of bat—more than 1, species have been described—where the pelage is all white. Its ears, tragi the cartilaginous projections in front of the ear openings , nose-leaf, and lips are a bright, yellowish orange. It is the first mammal known to have enough carotenoids in its skin to generate conspicuous color.

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Chiroderma Ectophylla relative to other genera [2] The Honduran white bat was described as a new species, Ectophylla alba, in by American zoologist Harrison Allen. Within Phyllostomidae, it is in the subfamily Stenodermatinae. Its species name "alba" comes from Latin " albus " meaning "white.

This species, along with four Diclidurus species and the ghost bat Macroderma gigas , is among the only currently known species of bat—more than 1, species have been described—where the pelage is all white.

Its ears, tragi the cartilaginous projections in front of the ear openings , nose-leaf, and lips are a bright, yellowish orange.

It is the first mammal known to have enough carotenoids in its skin to generate conspicuous color. Adult bats had higher yellow chroma in their ears than did juveniles. The yellow of the nose-leaf, however, had more variation.

Adult males also had significantly brighter nose-leaves than juvenile males. Similarly to the ears, the yellow chroma of the nose-leaf was greater in adults than in juveniles, though not different between the sexes. The authors suggested that the color difference of male and female nose-leaves is indicative of sexual dichromatism , meaning that females may select for males with brighter nose-leaves.

This conclusion was supported by the trend that males with brighter yellow nose-leaves tended to have better body conditions.

Females could thus use nose-leaf color as a metric of male fitness when selecting a mate. Reconstructions of ancestral states showed that the yellow coloration coevolved with tent-roosting. The inner margin of the tragus is convex, while the outer margin is coarsely serrated with four or five small lobes. The nose-leaf also has a serrated margin.

It has eight to ten small "warts" under its mouth. Its dental formula is 2. Its skull is similar in appearance to other species in its subfamily , with the exception of its very deep basioccipital pits. Tents are likely constructed by multiple individuals; females have been observed constructing tents, but it is likely that males do so as well. Once modified into a tent, a leaf lives approximately 7.

In selecting leaves to turn into tents, it appears that the age and size of the leaf is more important than the species of plant. Younger leaves may be preferred because they are easier to bite through and shape than older leaves.

Preferred leaves are in areas of low understory vegetation density, but high canopy vegetation density. Heliconia density is lower surrounding chosen leaves than would be expected if the bats selected leaves randomly. Features such as canopy density may help the tent maintain a consistent microclimate.

Tents are usually High canopy density could also protect its tent from disturbance from wind and rain. Low understory vegetation density is thought to be beneficial by providing an uncluttered airspace for the bats as they exit and enter their tents. Rather than roosting in a single tent consistently, the Honduran white bat has a network of tents scattered across the forest; it alternates among these tents for roosting.

Single tents have been consistently occupied for up to 45 days. This almost completely conceals them if they remain still. It likely has several predators, including capuchin monkeys , Central American squirrel monkeys , and snakes.

The Honduran white bat prefers F. It also chooses fig trees that are the closest to its day roosts. Because it is highly specialized on the one species of fig, it has larger foraging movements than observed in frugivorous bats that are less specialized. Individuals have an average home range of It is unclear how it manages to survive on such a narrow diet, as it is predicted it should have to consume supplemental food sources.

It has been proposed that individuals give birth in April and September, and that estrus occurs post-parturition. During lactation , mothers will return to their roosts up to six times a night to feed their pups. It prefers wet evergreen forests and secondary forests, which can accommodate its specific roosting and dietary requirements.

It meets the criteria for this designation because its population is in a "significant decline. However, it is on the verge of qualifying for the vulnerable designation.

Reasons for its population decline include conversion of its habitat to farmland as well as an expanding human population. It was the first mammalian species to be documented with high enough concentrations of carotenoids to produce visible skin coloration.

It isolates the pigments from its diet, particularly the fruits of the Ficus colubrinae tree. Lutein , the carotenoid responsible for its yellow pigmentation, is present in its skin in its esterified form, while in its free form in the liver. This suggests that Honduran white bats possess a physiological mechanism to convert free lutein to esterified lutein, which humans are unable to do.

Lutein plays an important role in the eyes by preventing damage to the retina ; it is hypothesized that if the free lutein in human eyes was esterified, it would be more effective at preventing damage and preserving vision. Understanding the process by which Honduran white bats convert free lutein to esterified lutein could assist in the understanding of how the stability and bioavailability of carotenoids benefit human health.

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Jamaican flower bat P. MyARKive offers the scrapbook feature to signed-up members, allowing you to organize your favourite Arkive images and videos and share them with friends. Brown fruit-eating bat A. Honduran White Bat Though we edit our accounts for accuracy, we cannot guarantee all information in those accounts. Epiphytes and climbing plants are also abundant. They maintain this bachelor colony until the offspring have matured and left the maternity roosts. These bats lack a tail.

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Ectophylla alba

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